Chicche Verdi Del Nonno

GNOCCHI WITH BROWN BUTTER AND SAGE

 

A regional dish from the Italian province of Parma, these plump spinach gnocchi are excellent sprinkled with Parmesan cheese.  A regional dish from the Italian province of Parma, these plump spinach gnocchi are excellent sprinkled with Parmesan cheese.

SERVES 4-6

Ingredients

1 lb. russet potatoes, unpeeled
Kosher salt, to taste
4 oz. spinach
14 cups semolina flour, sifted, plus more
2 eggs, beaten
18 tbsp. unsalted butter
16 leaves fresh sage, minced
14 tsp. freshly grated nutmeg
Freshly ground pepper, to taste
4 tbsp. olive oil
3 tbsp. finely grated Parmesan

Instructions

Put potatoes into a 4-qt. pot of salted water; boil. Reduce heat to medium-low; simmer until potatoes are tender, 25 minutes. Drain; let cool. Peel potatoes; pass through medium plate of a food mill into a bowl.
Meanwhile, heat a 12″ skillet over medium-high heat. Add spinach and 1 tbsp. of water; cook until wilted. Press on spinach in a sieve to extract liquid. Finely chop spinach; stir together with potatoes and semolina and form a well in the center.
Add eggs and salt and, using a fork, beat eggs into potato mixture.
Transfer dough to a work surface dusted with semolina; knead to combine.
Divide the dough into 6 portions. Roll each portion into a 1⁄2″-thick rope. Cut ropes into 1⁄2″-wide pieces; transfer to a semolina-dusted sheet tray.
Melt 10 tbsp. butter in a 10″ skillet over medium heat; cook, swirling, until butter browns, about 6 minutes.
Add sage and nutmeg; season with salt and pepper.
Remove from heat; set aside.
Working in 4 batches, add 2 tbsp. butter and 1 tbsp. oil to a 12″ skillet over medium-high heat. Add dough pieces and cook, flipping once, until golden brown, 3–4 minutes.
Transfer to a baking sheet.
Wipe out the skillet and repeat with remaining butter, oil, and dough pieces.
Toss dumplings and brown butter sauce in the skillet until hot.
Serve sprinkled with Parmesan.
Chicche Verde  .jpg
Here is the photo of my version.  Served with a lovely red wine!
Would definitely make for friends.
I made the gnocchi about three in the afternoon, and just put them all together right before dinner.
Yummy~
Chicche Verdi Del Nonno

Chocolate Caramel Cake

This is my go-to cake for special occasions, as every always loves it. But you do have to love chocolate ~ Caramel ~ English Toffee!  It is a simple recipe, but the add-ins make it rich and delicious.

Chocolate Cake with Caramel .jpg

The Best Chocolate Cake Recipe

Ingredients

Chocolate Cake

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups sugar
  • ¾ cup unsweetened Dutch cocoa powder
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1½ teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon espresso powder (King Arthur available at Amazon)
  • 1 cup milk
  • ½ cup vegetable oil
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 cup boiling water
  • One jar of the best caramel topping you can find, kept in the refrigerator to make it harder.
  • English Toffee
  • Big Malted Milk Balls

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350º F.   Prepare two 9-inch cake pans by spraying with baking spray or buttering and lightly flouring. Then line with 9″ round parchment paper and spray again.  (I buy the pre-cut rounds by Wilton – available at Walmart)
  • For the cake:
  • Add flour, sugar, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda, salt and espresso powder to a large bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer. Whisk through to combine or, using your paddle attachment, stir through flour mixture until combined well.
  • Add milk, vegetable oil, eggs, and vanilla to flour mixture and mix together on medium speed until well combined. Reduce speed and carefully add boiling water to the cake batter. Beat on high speed for about 1 minute to add air to the batter.
  • Distribute cake batter evenly between the two prepared cake pans. Bake for 30-35 minutes, until a toothpick or cake tester inserted in the center, comes out clean.
  • Remove from the oven and allow to cool for about 10 minutes, remove from the pan and cool completely.
  • Using a serrated bread knife, cut each layer in half so you have four layers.
Putting it together:
  • Make the Chocolate Buttercream recipe shown below.  Pipe or spoon a ridge of the buttercream all around the outside of the first layer.
  • Fill the center with the now hardened caramel
  • Put on the second & third layer and repeat
  • Frost the cake with rest of the frosting (there always seems to be a bit too much)
  • Put the English Toffee in a ziplock bag and crush with your rolling pin or meat pounder.
  • Decorate how you like with the Malted Milk Balls

Chocolate Buttercream Frosting

INGREDIENTS

  • 1½ cups butter (3 sticks), softened
  • 1 cup unsweetened cocoa
  • 5 cups confectioner’s sugar
  • ½ cup milk
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • ½ teaspoon espresso powder

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Add cocoa to a large bowl or bowl of stand mixer. Whisk through to remove any lumps.
  2. Cream together butter and cocoa powder until well-combined.
  3. Add sugar and milk to cocoa mixture by adding 1 cup of sugar followed by about a tablespoon of milk. After each addition has been combined, turn mixer onto a high speed for about a minute. Repeat until all sugar and milk have been added.
  4. Add vanilla extract and espresso powder and combine well.
  5. If frosting appears too dry, add more milk, a tablespoon at a time until it reaches the right consistency. If it appears to wet and does not hold its form, add more confectioner’s sugar, a tablespoon at a time until it reaches the right consistency.

Serve with Champagne and have a wonderful time.

Chocolate Caramel Cake

Worst Generation of Cooks in the Kitchen

I found this article interesting, as all three of my sons and my daughter-in-law love to cook and have made some wonderful meals.  My sons would make me breakfast in bed for my birthday and for Valentines Day, starting when they were eight or nine.  They are all excellent cooks and they definitely know what and where to put a butter knife.  We sat down and ate with candles and cloth napkins whenever we could at home.  I thought it was important that they have good manners and know the basics in the kitchen. I always wanted them to be comfortable with any and all dining situations!  And, you what!  It worked.

According to Tasting Table, Millennials Are the worst generation of cooks in the kitchen

Only 60 percent can confidently identify a butter knife
Millennials Don't Know How to Cook

They might be able to apply Snapchat filters better than you can, but if there’s one thing millennials can’t do, is find their way around the kitchen.

According to a study from Porch, between millennials, Gen Xers and baby boomers, millennials rate themselves as the worst kitchen cooks of all, with only 5 percent of twenty- to thirtysomethings considering themselves “very good” at home cooking. They rate themselves last in being able to tackle (very) basic dishes like fried eggs, grilled cheese sandwiches, and lasagna. (Though, they do feel more confident than baby boomers at baking store-bought plop-and-drop cookie dough.)

And while many baby boomers aren’t so great at identifying a salad spinner, Thrillist notes it’s not so bad once you consider about 40 percent of millennials can’t even recognize a butter knife.

The one thing they are good at? According to the study, millennials are the top generation investing in meal delivery services and utilizing internet videos for cooking advice. Hey, at least they’re trying.

 

Worst Generation of Cooks in the Kitchen

Granite or ???

Is Granite Going Out of Style? This is an article from Home Advisor with some interesting information.  You have lots of options.  Here is a place to learn a little bit about some of them.

Could granite’s 30-year reign be coming to an end?  Granite remains a solid choice, as it is both durable and attractive and it’s become increasingly affordable. But there’s just no denying granite’s seeming decline. As homeowners opt for more modern kitchen designs, they’re also opting for more understated countertop alternatives.

Here’s a quick look at some of the countertop’s hottest contenders:

Engineered Quartz:

Perhaps granite’s top competitor, engineered quartz offers the beauty of stone without the maintenance. It’s tougher than granite, and it’s highly resistant to scratching, cracking, staining and heat. Unlike granite, which offers the unique qualities of natural stone, engineered quartz is largely uniform; because it’s engineered, there’s no choice of one-of-a-kind slab. There are, however, a number of colors and designs available from stark modern whites to options closely resembling marble. And, because engineered quartz is non-porous, it never has to be sealed like natural stone.

Wood:

Homeowners seek and appreciate natural wood countertops particularly easy butcher blocks and those custom-created by quality craftsmen. While wood countertops can add warmth, balance, and beauty to any modern home, they require a fair amount of maintenance. Because wood is susceptible to damage from heat and moisture, it must be sealed about once a month. The best part about wood, though, is that it can be refinished in the event that damage does occur.

Soapstone:

Soapstone is an attractive, natural quarried stone that ranges from light gray to green-black in color. While the material is soft and pliable, it’s nonporous so doesn’t require regular sealing like granite. Soapstone is resistant to stains and acidic materials. The downside to soapstone is that it is susceptible to scratches and deep indentations. Light gray soapstone will weather and darken over time, occasionally developing a patina finish. The material comes in smaller slabs so seams will be visible in soapstone countertops longer than seven feet.

Concrete:

Concrete countertops came onto the scene in the 1980s and they’ve evolved since. These days, precast concrete countertops are available in a number of different colors. Generally, they’re flat and smooth, and they can run from 1.5 inches to 10 feet long. While concrete countertops have historically cracked and chipped easily, recent innovations have made them less prone to damage. Concrete is naturally strong and heat-resistant, and slabs can be sealed to prevent staining.

Stainless Steel:

There’s a reason restaurants use stainless steel countertops in their kitchens. It’s heat-, rust- and stain-resistant; it’s easy to clean, and it won’t absorb or harbor even the toughest bacteria. The downside to stainless steel countertops is that they scratch easily and they show it. For this reason, it’s best to use a cutting board anytime you’re prepping food on a stainless steel countertop. It’s a good idea to choose a brushed stainless finish that will help conceal any marks. At first blush, you may think that stainless feels ultramodern or cold, but a balance of stainless steel and wood can create a warm, timeless and uber-functional kitchen.

Not Sure Which Countertop to Choose?

When you’re remodeling your kitchen, the most important question to ask yourself is this: Are you remodeling for yourself or a potential buyer? If you’re remodeling for yourself, go with what you like best. And if you love granite, by all means, go with granite! But if you’re remodeling with an eye toward selling, go with a more neutral option. You’ll get the upscale look you’re going for without alienating granite-tired buyers.

 

Granite or ???

White Chocolate Raspberry Brownies

One of my dear friends is turning 70 tomorrow and a lot of people are giving her a party on a Tuesday.  Since I work I had to come up with an “appetizer” to share that could sit in my car and be made with what I had in the pantry.  So Brownies are not exactly an appetizer, but I don’t think anyone will complain.  These should be yummy.  Screen Shot 2018-03-05 at 7.49.46 PM

People think that box mixes produce the perfect combination of chewy and moist brownies. Results should be at least as good as a mix without all the processing and questionable ingredients without dirtying many dishes. For one-bowl brownies with the proper level of chewiness both butter and oil is used. Using both cocoa and unsweetened chocolate add to the intense chocolaty richness and create a platform of flavor for any add-ins. By being strategic with the addition of ingredients, saved dishes and combined the batter all in one large bowl. Baked on the lowest rack in the oven, the brownies cooked nicely on the bottom and edges without overcooking and drying out. Folding white chocolate chips into the batter and swirling in raspberry jam gave the brownies colorful character and a fruitiness to offset their deep chocolate flavor.

INGREDIENTS

½ cup plus 2 tablespoons boiling water
2 ounces unsweetened chocolate, chopped fine
cup (1 ounce) Dutch-processed cocoa powder
2 ½ cups (17 1/2 ounces) sugar
½ cup plus 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 large eggs plus 2 large yolks
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 ¾ cups (8 3/4 ounces) all-purpose flour
¾ teaspoon salt
1 cup (6 ounces) white chocolate chips

I used a combination of milk and semi-sweet as that is what I had on hand. 

cup raspberry jam
White Chocolate Raspberry Brownies

The Perfect Soft-Boiled Egg

This a great article that I found in Cooking Light.  Eggs are so easy to make when there is not much else in the refrigerator or you don’t have much time.  Eggs for dinner once in awhile are just not that bad.

egg

I find it laughable that the author, SARA TANE found personalities within the use of eggs.  I will share them here, but not sure that I agree with all of them.

Scrambled? Very untrustworthy—pray that the eggs are soft-scrambled at the very least. Hard-boiled? This person lacks excitement.

Omelet? They’re greedy—what this person has will never be enough for them. Over-easy? This person is impatient, but skilled with a spatula.

 Sunny side-up fried? Top-notch human. ( I am guessing this is her favorite) . Hopefully they’re basting the whites until they’re perfectly set and the edges are frizzled and crackly.

Poached egg? Wooaaahhhh, fancy! In the microwave? Surprise, this person is actually an alien.

Soft-boiled? Now, that’s a wise person.

With so many different ways to prepare your eggs, the process can become overwhelming. How do you choose? What is right for you? I’ll tell you what—soft-boiled eggs. Perhaps the most underrated way to cook an egg, soft boiling is just as easy as it is delightful. Despite its simple method, a soft-boiled egg has something about it that adds a level of sophistication and intrigue to any situation. Do not fear the runny yolk—it’s what makes this such an elegant creation.

So here’s how it works. Start by bringing a medium pot of water to a boil, and then once it’s there, bring it down to a rapid simmer. Gently lower your eggs into the pot with a large spoon (if you drop them in, they’ll crack, release their whites and yolk into the hot water, and it will be tragic). While some people belong to the belief system that you should start with the eggs in the water and then bring everything to a boil, I find this technique to be less reliable when making soft-boiled eggs. Because the name of the game here is timing, I prefer to wait for my water to reach a rapid simmer, and then introduce the eggs into the equation. This way, I can set my timer and be confident that I know when they’re done.

Once the eggs have been gently lowered down into the simmering water, set a timer for anywhere from 6 to 8 minutes. As you make more and more soft-boiled eggs, you’ll have a better feel for how long you like to let them cook–the longer they go, the more set the yolk will be. It’s also worth noting that you might need to tack on a couple extra minutes if you’re cooking anymore than 4 eggs at a time. Personally, I can get down with a 6-minute egg. The yolk is runny (but not cold) and the whites are firm and set. However, if you like, by letting it cook for closer to 8 minutes, the outside of the yolk becomes somewhat firm and creamy, and the inside takes on a jammy texture.

When you’re ready to stop cooking your eggs, gently lift the eggs out of the simmering water with a slotted spoon and place them into an ice water bath, letting them rest for at least 5 minutes. Once they’re no longer hot to the touch, gently tap the egg around its entire surface on the counter to create cracks in the shell, and then carefully and slowly peel back the shell (aiming to pinch onto that very thin membrane that lines the egg’s shell and makes its removal seamless). Many people find that running cold water over the egg during peeling makes the process easier—give it a try if it feels right to you.

Remember, if you only cooked the eggs for around 6 minutes, the yolk is not going to be solidified, so make sure to handle with care, or else you might have a punctured yolk on your hands.

This is an interesting link of how to separate eggs in a water bottle.  Got to try it!

http://www.myrecipes.com/well-done/how-to-separate-eggs-with-a-water-bottle

The Perfect Soft-Boiled Egg