Finally a day in my studio and inspired

Finally a day in my studio and inspired by the beautiful day and living on the water.  Surfsong catches the moon on the water if you like.  Picture a dreamy night, walking on the beach with the moon up above and the surf ponding in the distance.  Can’t you just see yourself there.   Many nights in my life I have walked that path and it always made me appreciate the beauty and power of nature.

 

www.dianakingsley.net

Image

 

Aside

“Rich impressionist colors tainted with a little humor”

Today I was asked to describe my art in ten words or so. The painting shared today is named “Three is Not Company”. What I like to do is make you think about what I have painted and realize there is more than goes into a painting than you might think. It was the day, it was Paris, is amazing how uncomfortable the woman on the right looked as the man in the middle was intensely interested in the woman on the left.

What do you think, is it a good description of my art?

www.dianakingsley.net

Image

Tulips, like lovers don’t always return ?

Tulips, like lovers don't always return

Taking a class on collage got me thinking, how can you use your art to get a point across, have some fun with it and bring it to a slightly larger audience.

In the next few days, I will be taking paintings I have done in the past or drawings and will try to add interesting quotes to them.

Would love your ideas or suggestions if you so desire!

Image

Quiet can be your best friend

Quiet can be your best friend

Having just returned from a two week road trip to meet my beautiful two year old grand daughter from Cambodia, traveling with my youngest son to visit my oldest son was rewarding in many ways.

Getting to know Claire a little was totally amazing! Traveling with my youngest son was a fun adventure. We talked a lot on the trip, but also found we could comfortably drive for many miles not needing conversation.

I have always loved the quiet times of the day. First thing in the morning, enjoying a cup of coffee and view from my kitchen and last moment before the sunset when the quiet of the day joins the beauty of the sky.

Image

Being alone is not always lonely…

Being alone is not always lonely...

Thought it might be fun to take some of my more simple paintings and add the commentary I was thinking about when I painted them.

This was a boat that I photographed in Cinque Terra, Italy and I always loved the serenity of the photo, and think I translated that into the painting.

I love my alone time! It is not that I don’t enjoy the company of family and friends; it is just that time walking or reading gives me the freedom to do exactly what I want to do at that time.

Enjoy your “alone” time as it makes time with family and friends much for valuable

Image

How do you see the world?

How do you see the world?

No artist sees things as they really are. If he did, he would no longer paint.

Love this quote by Oscar Wilde.

Who knows if they really saw their world this way, but is does hopefully make you stop and think about how differently our eyes find the world through our art.

 

Driving through Eastern Washington this week I was entranced with the beauty of the fields in the Poulouse.  Undulating hills in golds, greens, browns and skies heavy with clouds.  As an artist we look at the view as if it is our next painting, not a barn or tree on the side of the road.  I have often thought that so many people just drive through our amazingly beautiful country and see little other than the road ahead.  If we expand the view our joy can be amazing!!

Image

10 Things You Should Never Say to an Artist

10 Things You Should Never Say to an Artist

Yesterday in my painting class I worked all day on a painting of the Bloedel Reserve. I had taken in five photographs to choose from and discussed which one to paint with my instructor. She helped me select a photo that was far from my first choice.

Mid day I was doing well, but by the end of the day the painting was not working. I had wished I had selected another photograph to paint. As the day ended, she commented that I select lonely looking photographs to paint, then have a hard time with them.

Perhaps I should listen to my inner spirit and select the photograph I love, not the one someone else thinks would work.

What do you think? What works best for you?

Image

Was Van Gogh Colorblind?

Courtesy Wikimedia Commons
by Kyle Chayka
Published: August 28, 2012
Van Gogh’s “Wheat Field behind Saint Paul Hospital with a Reaper” — Top: Original / Bottom: Color blind simulation

Could Vincent van Gogh‘s acidic sense of color and preference for bright, clashing hues, long the province of the Fauves, be a result of colorblindness and not just an aesthetic judgment? An essay by Kazunori Asada, a Japanese medical scientist and poet, has recently come to the attention of science blogs drawn to its argument that the famous painter wasn’t so much an artistic revolutionary as he was visually impaired. Asada’s article was sparked by an experience in Hokkaido, Japan’s “Color Vision Experience Room,” an immersive simulator that makes it possible to perceive color the way people with different types of colorblindness might experience it. When Asada saw replicas of the artist’s canvases, he had a revelation.

Van Gogh’s paintings, Asada writes, became more beautiful and more natural in the filtered light. “The incongruity of color and roughness of line had quietly disappeared,” the scientist writes. “Each picture had changed into one of brilliance with very delicate lines and shades.” Asada went on to experiment with a piece of software that further simulates different variations of colorblindness, settling on a midrange spectrum deficiency that he felt best modified van Gogh’s work. The deficiency meant that van Gogh’s eyes had a moderate lack of receptors for the color red.

Asada’s filtered images are indeed more even and naturalistic than the originals; instead of the bright, brash colors for which we know van Gogh, the hues are organic and flow more smoothly into each other — they’re more traditionally complementary. The intense reds and oranges of “Wheat Field behind Saint-Paul Hospital” turn into autumnal golds. The eerie greens of “Starry Night” become more yellow, the red-oranges in the field are gone from “The Sower,” and “Sunflowers” becomes drab. See above left for one example and scroll through Asada’s essayfor the rest.

There are clear issues with Asada’s argument. First, the versions of the paintings he uses aren’t necessarily true to life. Our dependence on digital screens means that it’s hard to make colors remain stable on a computer-to-computer basis. Asada’s images aren’t of the highest quality, and there’s a strong chance the true paintings look completely different. There’s also the philosophical argument. How can we argue that van Gogh’s paintings look better through a filter? To assume that the painter’s provocative artistic choices were simply the result of a medical condition is to completely disregard his own creativity. Van Gogh’s colors are meant to clash; the unorthodox pairings were part of the Post-Impressionist and Fauvist aesthetic. Or were Paul Gauguin and André Derain also colorblind?

The discussion is reminiscent of the argument that after Monet had the lens of one eyeballremoved due to cataracts, his palette changed to deep blue because he was suddenly able to see ultraviolet light (the lens, protecting the eye, filters ultraviolet rays naturally). It’s the chicken or the egg. Were the artists innovative simply because of their biology, or were they innovative because they were creative, pioneering artists? The latter seems more likely.

Was Van Gogh Colorblind?

Diana’s Rendition of the Model

Taking a class on Portrait Painting with master painter Michael Maczuga has been an amazing experience.  There are 13 students in a smallish space in the classroom at Cole Gallery in Edmonds.  You can see Michael’s work at http://michaelmaczuga.com/

Taking classes awakens your awareness to new ways of doing things, new ways of thinking and the opportunity to “hand out” with other artists.  First day was challenging, but second day was fun!  Today should be more of both:  Challenging and Fun!!
Diana's Rendition of the Model

Diana’s Rendition of the Model

Drema Tolle Perry Small Art Makes Big Impact

Drema Tolle Perry Small Art Makes Big Impact

Found this artist’s work online and signed up for one of her classes on Whidbey Island in May. I have always thought small paintings could be beautiful and hers are exquisite.

Image